Apr
13
10:00 AM10:00

Making of Palm Crosses

The making of Palm crosses

We meet at 10am in the Chapter Room. If you do not know how to make a palm cross, don’t worry! We will provide a diagram and lessons. I would think it will take about an hour and a bit to make the number of crosses we require so do come along anytime.

 

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Apr
14
8:00 AM08:00

Palm Sunday 8am

We begin our Holy Week pilgrimage with Jesus by recalling how Jesus rode in triumph into Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is the Sunday before he was crucified, when the people hailed him as king.  The colour in the church is red, the colour of Christ the King.  The church is decorated with palm branches and palms in the forms of crosses are distributed to all worshippers. 

At the start of the service, which happens outside in the Memorial Garden, the palm crosses are held up to be blessed.  The palms, in the shape of crosses foreshadow Jesus' suffering and death. Perhaps what is most noticeable about this service is the two lengthy Gospel readings. The one records how the crowds praised him and wanted to make him King. The other records how that same crowd shouted, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” The 8am service will have incense.

 

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Apr
14
10:00 AM10:00

Palm Sunday 10am

We begin our Holy Week pilgrimage with Jesus by recalling how Jesus rode in triumph into Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is the Sunday before he was crucified, when the people hailed him as king.  The colour in the church is red, the colour of Christ the King.  The church is decorated with palm branches and palms in the forms of crosses are distributed to all worshippers. 

At the start of the service, which happens outside in the Memorial Garden, the palm crosses are held up to be blessed.  The palms, in the shape of crosses foreshadow Jesus' suffering and death. Perhaps what is most noticeable about this service is the two lengthy Gospel readings. The one records how the crowds praised him and wanted to make him King. The other records how that same crowd shouted, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”.

 

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Apr
15
7:00 PM19:00

Service of darkness - Tenebrae

The Service of Tennebrae is a dark service. The word itself comes from Latin, and means “darkness”. The form of service which began in the Middle Ages, consists of a cross of candles lit before the service. At the start of the service the church lights are switched off, and one candle at a time is extinguished after each of the readings recalling the abandonment of Jesus by his friends and the encroaching threat of death. Finally, only one shining candle remains, signifying the light of Christ.

Then this last candle is extinguished, while sounds of chaos rattled the darkness, symbolizing the apparent victory of the forces of evil and darkness. After a period of utter darkness and silence, the Christ-candle is re-ignited, and restored on the altar. This reminds us that though the darkness thought it had won the battle over good, it had not, as Christ rose on the third day. This service will be less than an hour in duration.

 

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Apr
16
7:00 PM19:00

Stations of the Cross

Ever since Jesus walked the road to Golgotha, Christians wanted to walk in the actual footsteps of Jesus to the cross in Jerusalem. For most of us this opportunity will not arise. It was the Franciscans who first promoted the use of scenes from the last journey of Jesus to the cross. This was no doubt inspired by the Crusaders who often erected tableaux of places they had visited in the Holy Land. So has developed a devotion which has come to be called the ‘Stations of the Cross.’ Between each station will be time of readings and meditation. The service will be less than an hour in duration.

 

 

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Apr
18
7:00 PM19:00

Maundy Thursday

Commemoration of the Institution of the Lord’s Supper, Stripping of the Altar and One Hour Watch of the Passion

This is the day of the Last Supper when Jesus instituted the Sacrament of Holy Communion as a memorial of his death and resurrection.  The colour in the church is white.  On this day Holy Communion is celebrated in the evening, the time the Last Supper was celebrated in the Upper Room by Jesus and his followers.

 We reenact the washing of the disciples feet by Jesus and so will be celebrating in the Eucharist in an alternative form, one which is closer to original setting of the Lord’s supper.

 After the Lord’s Supper service, the church is stripped of all decoration. This year, as in previous years, the congregation will be invited to take part in the stripping of the sanctuary. While the congregation does this, the priest wearing a purple stole (the colour of penitence) will read Psalm 22. This action enables  us to remember how Jesus, deserted by his friends was stripped and nailed to the cross.  In sorrow we recall how often we desert him.

 After the Last Supper, Jesus and his disciples went to pray in the Garden of Gethsemane.  The disciples fell asleep.  Jesus asked: “Could you not watch with me one hour?”  It was in the garden that Jesus was arrested and taken away to be tried and crucified. 

 After the service, the Blessed Sacrament rests on the Altar of Repose.  Jesus is really present with us.  We try to spend an extra hour in silent prayer with him.

 

 

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Apr
19
9:00 AM09:00

Good Friday Service

The Good Friday Liturgy

On the first Good Friday, Jesus was nailed to the cross at 9.00 am.  From 12 noon until 3.00 pm darkness shrouded the land.  Jesus died at 3.00 pm

 The time we spend in church on Good Friday gives us the opportunity to watch by the cross, as his followers did that first Good Friday. The church is stark, stripped of all decoration. The service we use consists of four sections:

 The Liturgy of the Word in which God speaks through the Scriptures of his saving love for mankind.

 The General Intercessions in which the Church prays for the whole human race for whom Christ died.

 The Solemn Adoration of Christ Crucified in which devotion is centered on the cross, the symbol of Christ's redeeming death.

 The Holy Communion through which the faithful are sacramentally united to Christ, their crucified and risen Lord.

 On this occasion Holy Communion is given from the Reserved Sacrament.  All the reserved bread and wine remaining after the people have made their Communion is then consumed by the president and his helpers. From after the Good Friday service until the first Easter Eucharist, the Aumbry remains empty, a reminder that on the Saturday Jesus lay dead in the tomb.  On all others days the Reserved Sacrament in the Aumbry is a reminder of the perpetual presence of the Risen Christ.

 PLEASE NOTE: The service that the service will not be three hours long. It will be in the region of an hour and a half. The Good Friday Liturgy is a complete service, and people should attend it in its entirety. It is not like the Three Hour Devotion, a service where people come and go during the service as they feel inclined. In fact coming and going during the middle of the service distracts others in their worship. Tea and hot cross buns will be served after the service.

 

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Apr
21
6:00 AM06:00

Easter Day Sunrise Eucharist Service

This is the climax of our week of activities.  We come with joy to meet our risen Lord in the Sacrament on Easter Day. On Easter Sunday morning at sunrise we meet outside the church and the service begins with the lighting of the new fire.  As God, in the Old Testament made his presence known by the sign of the pillar of fire, so fire now represents the return of Christ, the light of the world, from the darkness of the grave.  The Paschal Candle is lit from the new fire, and we enter the darkened church in procession.  The darkness reminds us of the darkness of Calvary, when Christ died on the cross, and the darkness of the tomb.  As the procession moves up through the Church, the light spreads and the church is revealed in all the glory of its Easter decorations.

 The Paschal candle is set up and will burn at all services until the Feast of the Ascension (and thereafter at Baptisms and funerals) a reminder that Christ is risen and always present with us.  The Exultet, or Easter Proclamation is recited, a great hymn of praise, and then lessons and psalms and hymns remind us of the redemption Christ brings.

 The sunrise on Easter Sunday morning signifies Christ's passage from the dead to the living by the liturgy which begins in darkness (sin, death) and is enlightened by the fire and the candle representing Lumen Christi (the Light of Christ) just as the Church, the Mystical Body of Christ, the community of believers, is led from spiritual darkness to the light of his truth. We rejoice at Christ's resurrection from the darkness of the tomb; and we pray for our passage from death into eternal life, from sin into grace, from the weariness and infirmity of old age to the freshness and vigour of youth, from the anguish of the Cross to peace and unity with God, and from this sinful world unto the Father in heaven.

 During the service we renew the vows of our Baptism and are sprinkled with water as a reminder of the event, for Baptism is the Sacrament in which we die with Christ and rise again to new life in him.

 

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